MACC/DC Partner’s Meeting Focuses on Cyber Security


On September 13, 2017 the Manufacturing Alliance of Chester County and Delaware County held an Industrial Partners’ meeting on the topic of Cyber Security.  Charles Sgrillo of Kreischer Miller, a “Certified Ethical Hacker”, presented an interesting and chilling assessment of today’s cyber risks and what all organizations should do to mitigate them.

See this link for his presentation:  InfoSec 101.

In addition to the presentation, the discussion and post-meeting conversation generated valuable information for those in attendance.

We understand the busy schedule we all keep these days; consequently, we strive to provide useful, practical information and peer dialog at each meeting.   Members indicated that the meeting was very worthwhile.

Save the date for our next Partners’ meeting, November 16, in conjunction with Tech360, being held at Penn State Great Valley. We hope to see you there!

Omega Design and Netzsch Premier Technologies Sign Up for Manufacturing Day Events – 10/6/2017


WHAT IS MANUFACTURING DAY?

Manufacturing Day℠ is a celebration of modern manufacturing meant to inspire the next generation of manufacturers. Manufacturing Day occurs on the first Friday in October — this year Manufacturing Day is Oct 6, 2017.

While Manufacturing Day is officially Oct. 6, companies and community organizations should plan their events on the date in October that works best for them. No matter the date, events should be registered on the site and can be marked as public or invitation-only events.

Registered event hosts have access to free event planning and execution resources and toolkits to make planning a Manufacturing Day event easy!

So far, MACC/DC members Omega Design and Netzsch Premier Technologies have signed up to host an event!

Should you be interested, please follow this link:

http://www.mfgday.com/user/register


Manufacturing Alliance of Chester and Delaware Counties

Summary Job Posting

Effective Date: 8/31/2017

Company Name and location:

Esschem, Inc.

4000 Columbia Avenue

Linwood, PA 19061

610-497-9000

www.esschem.com
Position Title

Chemical Operator

Summary Job Description:

The purpose of the Chemical Operator position is the manufacture of polymers.

Essential Duties:

·         operating equipment in the Reactor Room, Pilot Plant, Drying/Sifting Room, and Bone Cement Room including:

                -reactors

                -centrifuges

                -dryers

                -sifters

·         keeping the reactor room supplied with dry raw materials

·         weighing up of raw materials as needed

·         assisting mechanic in changing monomer drums

·         changing the totes when empty

·         acting as an attendant during confined space entry

·         assisting the mechanic with sifter changes

·         general housekeeping of work areas

·         proper disposal of waste

·         proper disposal of empty drums

·         compliance with the current collective bargaining agreement

·         completing paperwork associated with responsibilities

·         spot checking the raw material supplies daily

·         assisting other Chemical Operators, answering questions, helping to solve problems

·         communicating the daily production schedule to others

·         coordinating products in drying/sifting room

·         making adjustments on process controllers and other supporting equipment for individual products

·         helping with training of potential new Operators in the reactor, drying/sifting and bone cement areas

·         spot checking the reactors and advising the supervisor on which reactors need to be submitted for chip and clean

·         performing the reactor inspections for a batch kick off per supervisor’s request

Education/ Skills:

High school diploma or equivalent

·         Completion of the pre-employment physical and physical capacities

·         Must be able to climb stairs and ladders

·         English language proficiency

·         Completion of training and qualification procedure

Action:

For consideration, please apply to: esschemweb@esschem.com

Esschem is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes inquiries from all qualified candidates.

 

Chemical Manufacturing Jobs at Esschem


Manufacturing Alliance of Chester and Delaware Counties

Summary Job Posting

Effective Date: 8/31/2017

Company Name and location:

Esschem, Inc.

4000 Columbia Avenue

Linwood, PA 19061

610-497-9000

www.esschem.com
Position Title

Maintenance Mechanic
Summary Job Description:

The purpose of this position is to assist in ensuring a safe workplace, while maximizing equipment up time. Performing assigned functions to maximize equipment up time.

Essential Duties:

Performing all jobs assigned according to procedures

Repairing plant equipment breakdowns when work is within current ability levels

Performing new equipment installation when work is within current ability levels

Performing preventive maintenance when work is within current ability levels

Performing electrical work when work is within current ability levels

Performing carpentry jobs when work is within current ability levels

Performing machine shop jobs when work is within current ability levels

Working with and directing the activities of the Maintenance Helper when assigned.

May be assigned to work at the discretion of the Maintenance Manager or Assistance Maintenance Manager

Education/ Skills:

-High school diploma or equivalent

-Completion of the pre-employment physical

-Must be able to climb stairs and ladders

-English language proficiency

-Minimum of one year experience in a process plant as Maintenance Mechanic

Action:

For consideration, please apply to: esschemweb@esschem.com

Esschem is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes inquiries from all qualified candidates.

 

Manufacturing Alliance of Chester and Delaware Counties

Summary Job Posting

Effective Date: 8/31/2017

Company Name and location:

Esschem, Inc.

4000 Columbia Avenue

Linwood, PA 19061

610-497-9000

www.esschem.com
Position Title

Chemical Operator

Summary Job Description:

The purpose of the Chemical Operator position is the manufacture of polymers.

Essential Duties:

·         operating equipment in the Reactor Room, Pilot Plant, Drying/Sifting Room, and Bone Cement Room including:

-reactors

-centrifuges

-dryers

-sifters

·         keeping the reactor room supplied with dry raw materials

·         weighing up of raw materials as needed

·         assisting mechanic in changing monomer drums

·         changing the totes when empty

·         acting as an attendant during confined space entry

·         assisting the mechanic with sifter changes

·         general housekeeping of work areas

·         proper disposal of waste

·         proper disposal of empty drums

·         compliance with the current collective bargaining agreement

·         completing paperwork associated with responsibilities

·         spot checking the raw material supplies daily

·         assisting other Chemical Operators, answering questions, helping to solve problems

·         communicating the daily production schedule to others

·         coordinating products in drying/sifting room

·         making adjustments on process controllers and other supporting equipment for individual products

·         helping with training of potential new Operators in the reactor, drying/sifting and bone cement areas

·         spot checking the reactors and advising the supervisor on which reactors need to be submitted for chip and clean

·         performing the reactor inspections for a batch kick off per supervisor’s request

Education/ Skills:

High school diploma or equivalent

·         Completion of the pre-employment physical and physical capacities

·         Must be able to climb stairs and ladders

·         English language proficiency

·         Completion of training and qualification procedure

Action:

For consideration, please apply to: esschemweb@esschem.com

Esschem is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes inquiries from all qualified candidates.

 

From AON: From Malware To Phishing: Your Guide To Cyber Crime


OVERVIEW

In May 2017, computer users around the world were greeted with a worrying red screen and a message demanding the payment of up to $600 in bitcoins to unlock their computers. This was “WannaCry”, one of the biggest ransomware attacks in history. It is estimated to have caused around $4 billion in damages, hitting around 200,000 targets, including the U.K.’s National Health Service and Spanish telecoms provider Telefonica.

In Aon’s 2017 Global Risk Management Survey, cyber risk was rated a top five global risk. In 2016, it cost the global economy an estimated $450 billion and resulted in around two billion stolen records – including over 100 million U.S. patient records. By 2019, losses could hit $2 trillion – more than two percent of the world’s economy.

Companies, and their leaders, are aware of this. But while it’s one thing to admit there’s a threat – it’s another to actually address it. And as our lives become increasingly digitized, the onus will be on us to understand exactly what types of cyber threats are out there.

Please click on this link to read more:

http://www.theonebrief.com/from-malware-to-phishing-your-guide-to-cyber-crime/?utm_source=subscribe&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weeklyemail&elq_mid=49170&elq_cid=6471335&elqTrackId=25874a6e7d7f46cbb65c99505e4948f6

Labor Secretary Acosta Calls for National Apprenticeship Programs


BY ELLIE ASHFORD AUGUST 11, 2017    

Posted in University Business, 8/16/17

https://www.universitybusiness.com/news/acosta-calls-national-apprenticeship-programs

Apprenticeship programs jointly developed by community colleges and businesses – and scaled up on a nationwide basis – could go a long way toward closing the nation’s skills gap, according to U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta.

“Our job is to  ensure America’s workforce is prepared to meet the demands of a global and ever-changing economy,” Acosta told participants on Thursday at the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) board of directors summer retreat in Washington, D.C.

AACC could be the “perfect partner” to work on this effort, he said, and AACC President Walter Bumphus agreed to take up the challenge.

The unemployment rate is just 4.3 percent, the lowest it’s been in 17 years, Acosta said, yet there are many people not in the labor force because they lack the appropriate skills.

Seven million people are unemployed, while there are 6.2 million job openings. That mismatch is caused by an “increasing gap between the skills the workforce demands and the education being offered by the college and university system,” he said.

Scaling up

Acosta called for “demand-driven education” that responds to the skills needed by employers.

He pointed to the building trades, which spend $1 billion a year on skills training and asked why that model couldn’t be pushed across all industries.

Noting that there’s a shortage of pharmacy technicians, he suggested bringing pharmacies and community colleges together to create a national apprenticeship program – with 80 percent of the curriculum covering core skills and 20 percent company specific.

AACC board members described several examples of how they are already partnering with companies to develop apprenticeship and other workforce programs.

Gateway Technical College in Wisconsin is working with Snap-on Inc., said President Bryan Albrecht; Linn-Benton Community College in Oregon is working with Boeing, noted President Gregory Hamann; and Paris Junior College in Texas is partnering with Kimberly-Clark, added President Pamela Anglin.

Acosta agreed that colleges are doing a good job individually, but he challenged them to come up with a mechanism to scale up these efforts on a nationwide level. To expand a program from serving hundreds or thousands of students to millions requires “the ability to respond in an agile and collective manner,” he said.

“We need to do this more efficiently,” Acosta said. The education infrastructure needs to be streamlined, so the same curriculum can be used at multiple community colleges.

 

AACC board members discuss apprenticeships with the labor secretary.

AACC’s Bumphus agreed to work with the Labor Department on a plan for scaling up apprenticeship programs.

“We want to be that infrastructure,” he said.

Both Bumphus and Acosta noted that the accreditation piece is a challenge.

“It’s my impression that accreditation is sufficiently decentralized to discourage agile actions,” Acosta said.

Another obstacle is the lack of financial aid for short-term training. AACC has proposed expanding the Pell program to provide colleges with additional student aid for certificate programs that are less than 600 hours.

Sandra Kurtinitis, president of the Community College of Baltimore County and chair-elect of AACC’s board, called this “one of the most important things the administration could do.”

A clear definition

As the Labor Department implements the executive order on apprenticeship programs issued by President Trump in June, Acosta said workforce boards could play a stronger role in referring people to apprenticeships and asked AACC to propose a mechanism for identifying these programs.

The definition of apprenticeships is broad, he acknowledged. For Acosta, it refers to a program where people are working and attending classes at the same time; involves hands-on, as well as classroom learning; and includes pay for apprentices. He said the department will issue a more precise definition this fall.

Apprenticeship programs shouldn’t be limited to the trades, he said, noting they can involve every occupation from truck drivers to commodities traders.

“The idea that apprenticeships are limited to the trades is a reflection of a deeper issue,” Acosta said. “We need to bring dignity back to all career paths, not just those attached to four-year degrees. ”

“We are prepared to help you and the administration close the skills gap and get unemployed people employed,” said Christine Johnson, chancellor of the Community Colleges of Spokane (Washington). “That’s what we do every day. We’re ready to work with you.”

“This is great start to a very important relationship,” Acosta said

Tuition Free Manufacturing Courses at DCCC


Attached are the Fall 2017 courses available for the Manufacturing Alliance’s exclusive Tuition Free Manufacturing Course Program at DCCC. If any of your employees needs or has an interest in one of these Fall 2017 courses, please call or email:

 

Karen P. Kozachyn Ed.D.
Dean, Workforce Development and Community Education.
Delaware County Community College
 e-mail: Kkozachyn@dccc.edu
901 South Media Line Rd
Media, PA 19063
Office T202
Right click to see attachment below:

 

From AON: 4 Lessons And 7 Questions From The WannaCry Ransomware Attack


OVERVIEW

All around the world, hundreds of thousands of computer users have been confronted with a big red screen demanding in big red letters a payment of up to $600 in bitcoins to unlock it.

They had fallen victim to the ransomware virus WannaCry, which locked up more than 200,000 computers in more than 150 countries on May 12, 2017.

While the initial WannaCry virus was partially stopped in its tracks after a couple of days, the full extent of the damage remains unclear. Plus there are fears that a second wave of ransomware viruses could soon be on its way.

“WannaCry’s worm-like behavior and its ability to easily propagate across the organization make this a particularly dangerous strain of ransomware,” says Ed Stroz, Co-President at Stroz Friedberg, an Aon Company.

“The malware spreads from the infected computer by scanning other computers and systems on the network, and over the internet, infecting these connected machines by exploiting the same vulnerability, all without any user action.

“Essentially, it only takes one infected user on a network to put the whole organization at risk.”

Another factor behind WannaCry’s speed and relative success is the intricate and Byzantine nature of modern computer networks.

“One of the challenges of cyber is that it is a very complex environment,” says Jim Trainor, Senior Vice President, Aon Risk Solutions and former Assistant Director of the FBI’s Cyber Division in Washington, DC.

“Bad actors use and exploit infrastructure both in and out of the United States. A lot of groups who conduct such criminal activity don’t reside in the U.S. This makes it increasingly challenging for both government and companies to protect themselves because those attacking them don’t actually reside in the locations in which they operate.”

With cyber risk on the rise, and business interruption a growing concern, what key lessons can organizations learn from the WannaCry incident?

 

Please click on the following link for more information:

http://www.theonebrief.com/lessons-learned-questions-posed-by-wannacry-ransomware-attack/?elq_mid=48380&elq_cid=6471335&utm_source=weeklyemail3&utm_campaign=weeklyemail3&elqTrackId=5288470b423146138f512b9af08b7a81&elq=4bd0acb36a0b4c3483c923d67cc86213&elqaid=48380&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=19007

Resource Directory


The MACC/DC promotes the growth of the manufacturing industry by providing workforce and economic development services to partnering companies.  We achieve this by helping manufacturers enhance growth and prosperity through attracting and retaining new talent as well as skills training; building networks that help access best practices, training, and information; enhancing community awareness of the value and opportunities that manufacturing provides and developing additional value-added services for manufacturers.

 

Key Initiatives Include:

TRAINING – develop customized training to meet the needs of manufacturers at convenient times and locations

PUBLIC RELATIONS – build a campaign that will increase membership; create resources to educate students, parents and advisors on the positive aspects of pursuing a career in manufacturing

PARTNERSHIP – discussions on common issues such as healthcare; comparative energy options; employee outreach and recruiting; bulk purchasing and resource sharing

 

One of our key strategies to meet the above vision is to become the ‘Go-To” resource for manufacturers in our counties, providing information and resources of common interest to manufacturers: shared solutions for growth and risk management

 

This Resource  Directory will support this strategy by becoming an efficient, growing and reliable source for our partners that will:

  • be focused on common issues important to manufacturers,
  • provide information to busy manufacturers to help understand and access fragmented public and private resources to support manufacturers’ objectives,
  • identify opportunities for partners to cooperate to share best practices, leverage influence, and address common needs

Please click on the Resource Directory to access information on resources you may need, and please feel free to provide any feedback. Also, please make suggestions regarding trusted resources you have vetted and used, that your peer manufacturers may be able to use.

Please e-mail any suggestions to Craig Fitz at Cfitz@dccc.edu.

Delaware County Community College Receives Nearly $200,000 Grant for Process Control Technology Training


(Delaware and Chester Counties, PA • May 9, 2017)—The College received a nearly $200,000 state grant to augment training for adult students interested in pursuing technology careers. The College was one of 14 higher education institutions statewide to receive one of the tech grants from the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry.

The grants were awarded recently to educational institutions that have demonstrated a track record of training and placing adult students into occupations that are in high demand by local employers, according to the Department of Labor and Industry. The maximum grant award was $200,000; the College received $199,465. Preference was given to tech programs that benefit the manufacturing industry.

“These funds provide for equipment purchases and upgrades to provide adult students with industry-relevant training to better meet the needs of local employers,” Governor Wolf said in a press release. “The grants also allow local colleges and career and technical institutions to increase training capacity for in-demand programs to close the skills gap for local manufacturers in high-priority occupations.”

Delaware County Community College plans to use its grant to purchase six pieces of equipment to strengthen the College’s Process Control Technology certificate program. Process control technicians work in industries such as natural gas, oil distribution, food processing and pharmaceutical manufacturing.

The tech grants are part of a total $2 million in reemployment funds the Commonwealth made available earlier this year to accredited, post-secondary career and technical centers and colleges of technology working in concert with their local Workforce Development Boards, which act as the fiscal agents for the grants. The College worked with the Delaware County Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and the College thanks WIB Executive Director John Daly for his leadership and assistance in obtaining the tech grant.

Delaware County Community College has a state-of-the art STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Complex, consisting of the STEM Center and a free-standing 32,000-square-foot Advanced Technology Center with the type of high-tech equipment used in advanced manufacturing, as well as state-of-the-art classroom and laboratory space.

For more information contact:

Karen P. Kozachyn Ed.D.
Dean, Workforce Development and Community Education.
Delaware County Community College
901 South Media Line Rd
Media, PA 19063
Office T202
Kkozachyn@dccc.edu